Visitors Forum Auerbach

FrankGerman1931-General InformationFrank Auerbach was born in Berlin. His Jewish parents sent him to boarding schoolin England as a refugee at the age of eight. After becoming an English citizen in 1947, he studied at St. Martin’s School of Art (1948-52) and the Royal College ofArt (1952-5). Auerbach also took evening art classes with David Bomberg, whobecame a strong inspirational source for the student’s emerging figurativepainting style, largely consisting of thick, heavily applied impasto. Auerbach has enjoyed a great deal of success in the modern art arena. As one of Britain’s leading contemporary artists, Auerbach is often considered a member of a group of “highly individual figurative painters known as the School of London.Through the successive postwar movements of Abstract Expressionism, Pop Art, Minimalism, and Conceptualism, these artists continued to paint from their own experience” (Higgins 128). His work was featured in a major Arts Council exhibition in 1978, and he participated in the 1986 Venice Biennale as a representative ofBritain. Even in the light of such public acclaim, the artist does receives negative critical commentary by those who find his paintings “muddy and overworked” (Chilvers 40). SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY Chilvers, Ian. A Dictionary of Twentieth Century of Art. Oxford/New York: Oxford University Press, 1998. p39-40. Ebony, David. “Urban Gestures,” Art In America 82:12 (Dec 1994) 88-91. Glover, Michael. “Frank Auerbach,” Art News 96:5 (May 1997) 176. Higgins, Judith. “Figure Under A Light Bulb,” Art News 87:4 (1988) 126-31. Peppiat, Michael. “Topographies of Color,” Architectural Digest 45:4 (1988) 43+. Phaidon Dictionary of Twentieth-Century Art. London/New York: Phaidon Limited, 1973. p17. Spender, Stephen. “Frank Auerbach,” Art International 26:1 (1983) 95-100.
The WorksSome highlights of works by this artist selected by Art Guide’s editors and readers.
Aberdeen Art Gallery, Scotland Portrait of JYM Seated
Ferens Art Gallery, Hull Building Site, Victoria Street
Touchstones Rochdale St Pancras steps
On ViewSome museums where works by this artist are on view selected by Art Guide’s editors and readers.
Ben Uri Art Society and Gallery, London
Bolton Museum and Art Gallery
Cleveland Gallery, Middlesbrough
Crawford Municipal Gallery, Cork
Hartlepool Art Gallery
Huddersfield Art Gallery
Southampton City Art Gallery
Tate Britain, London
Glebe House and Gallery, Church Hill
Hugh Lane Municipal Gallery of Modern Art, Dublin Further Information Planning travel to the UK
Valuations/buying & selling art
Directory of living artists Learning about art
Supporting the arts Visitors ForumI REALLY LIKE HIS EXPRESSIVE NATUTRE AND LIFE FORMING VEGATATIVE BEING OF ANOTHER WORLDLY PAINTING WITH HALF CLOSED EYES SEEMS TO REACH OUT AND GRAB YOUR BALLS IN ASTONISHMENT. Otherwords bloody good stuff mate.
a.s.doherty – 29-Apr-2002I had the fortune to attend his recent exhibit; �Frank Auerbach at the National Gallery: Working after the Masters.’, and be able to see and analyse his paintings face to face. This is important, as when you see his work in books or photos, it looks flat. However, seeing the actual pieces, made me realise that they are very much 3D, with layer upon layer of paint. Auerbach used to paint them, building and manipulating such a thick quantity of paint on the canvas as though it were a modelling material. It is very hard to believe, looking at them, that it is just paint, not reinforced underneath with something else. After he had painted something, he would put it on top of a filing cabinet for however long it took to try. This was usually several months before such a layer of paint would dry solidly. The colours in Auerbach�s earlier work seemed to be of uniform and similar colours, but it was when he was a student, it was less expensive to buy the unpopular colours. I personally think some of his most dramatic work was his greyscale and black and white works. He is extremely dynamic in the way he applies his media, the brush strokes clearly visible, and in all directions. An example of this and one of my favourites of Auerbach�s is �Head of Julia� 1960. This piece is a portrait of a woman. He used charcoal to create the piece, select areas of the canvas pitch black, and other areas stark white. It has a messy, but collective feeling in the piece, allowing al the different directions to cross and merge. There is areas of texture in the piece, that look rough and weathered because of how Auerbach has manipulated his media. Auerbach�s method in creating portrait studies involves noticing their key lines and shapes that make up a face, boldly emphasising them. The way he paints is distinctive, and easily recognisable because of his techniques. Auerbach makes tone no longer a necessity to the depth or forms of his work. He rather invites it to emphasise what he has already achieved on his own. His use of line is important for defining the features like the jaw or the side of the face. These things seem more and more unnessacery, but more as additional devices as we critically analyse his work and style of painting. The thick lines seem to pin the features within the painting down onto the canvas. Without them, the features in his work would seem as though they were floating. His paintings reflect this idea through how they give the impression of restriction of movement – A lack of freedom for the subjects within his pieces. The colours he uses within the piece suggest the struggle and the forced restraint of the colourful human spirit. Each painting conveys to me, a detectable fear, that is compressed well into the piece. As though the painting itself is smothering the subjects, so no one can see their true emotions. But they bleed through and over the lines in waves of distressed colour and abominations of shape and form. The more I looked at Auerbach�s work, the more I noticed how I could pick out certain lines and main areas, and especially while sketching his work, I found I by just reproducing my selected lines and areas, produced an image remarkably similar in form to Auerbach�s. This enabled me to begin to break down and take apart the whole structure of his works, and begin to achieve a greater depth and understanding of the way he works.
Susan Andrews – Art student from Cramlington High School – 21-Dec-2001Add your own comment.We very much welcome feedback and any further information that you can provide to help us maintain our databases. Auerbach, FrankGerman1931-General InformationFrank Auerbach was born in Berlin. His Jewish parents sent him to boarding schoolin England as a refugee at the age of eight. After becoming an English citizen in 1947, he studied at St. Martin’s School of Art (1948-52) and the Royal College ofArt (1952-5). Auerbach also took evening art classes with David Bomberg, whobecame a strong inspirational source for the student’s emerging figurativepainting style, largely consisting of thick, heavily applied impasto. Auerbach has enjoyed a great deal of success in the modern art arena. As one of Britain’s leading contemporary artists, Auerbach is often considered a member of a group of “highly individual figurative painters known as the School of London.Through the successive postwar movements of Abstract Expressionism, Pop Art, Minimalism, and Conceptualism, these artists continued to paint from their own experience” (Higgins 128). His work was featured in a major Arts Council exhibition in 1978, and he participated in the 1986 Venice Biennale as a representative ofBritain. Even in the light of such public acclaim, the artist does receives negative critical commentary by those who find his paintings “muddy and overworked” (Chilvers 40). SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY Chilvers, Ian. A Dictionary of Twentieth Century of Art. Oxford/New York: Oxford University Press, 1998. p39-40. Ebony, David. “Urban Gestures,” Art In America 82:12 (Dec 1994) 88-91. Glover, Michael. “Frank Auerbach,” Art News 96:5 (May 1997) 176. Higgins, Judith. “Figure Under A Light Bulb,” Art News 87:4 (1988) 126-31. Peppiat, Michael. “Topographies of Color,” Architectural Digest 45:4 (1988) 43+. Phaidon Dictionary of Twentieth-Century Art. London/New York: Phaidon Limited, 1973. p17. Spender, Stephen. “Frank Auerbach,” Art International 26:1 (1983) 95-100.
The WorksSome highlights of works by this artist selected by Art Guide’s editors and readers.
Aberdeen Art Gallery, Scotland Portrait of JYM Seated
Ferens Art Gallery, Hull Building Site, Victoria Street
Touchstones Rochdale St Pancras steps
On ViewSome museums where works by this artist are on view selected by Art Guide’s editors and readers.
Ben Uri Art Society and Gallery, London
Bolton Museum and Art Gallery
Cleveland Gallery, Middlesbrough
Crawford Municipal Gallery, Cork
Hartlepool Art Gallery
Huddersfield Art Gallery
Southampton City Art Gallery
Tate Britain, London
Glebe House and Gallery, Church Hill
Hugh Lane Municipal Gallery of Modern Art, Dublin Further Information Planning travel to the UK
Valuations/buying & selling art
Directory of living artists Learning about art
Supporting the arts Visitors ForumI REALLY LIKE HIS EXPRESSIVE NATUTRE AND LIFE FORMING VEGATATIVE BEING OF ANOTHER WORLDLY PAINTING WITH HALF CLOSED EYES SEEMS TO REACH OUT AND GRAB YOUR BALLS IN ASTONISHMENT. Otherwords bloody good stuff mate.
a.s.doherty – 29-Apr-2002I had the fortune to attend his recent exhibit; �Frank Auerbach at the National Gallery: Working after the Masters.’, and be able to see and analyse his paintings face to face. This is important, as when you see his work in books or photos, it looks flat. However, seeing the actual pieces, made me realise that they are very much 3D, with layer upon layer of paint. Auerbach used to paint them, building and manipulating such a thick quantity of paint on the canvas as though it were a modelling material. It is very hard to believe, looking at them, that it is just paint, not reinforced underneath with something else. After he had painted something, he would put it on top of a filing cabinet for however long it took to try. This was usually several months before such a layer of paint would dry solidly. The colours in Auerbach�s earlier work seemed to be of uniform and similar colours, but it was when he was a student, it was less expensive to buy the unpopular colours. I personally think some of his most dramatic work was his greyscale and black and white works. He is extremely dynamic in the way he applies his media, the brush strokes clearly visible, and in all directions. An example of this and one of my favourites of Auerbach�s is �Head of Julia� 1960. This piece is a portrait of a woman. He used charcoal to create the piece, select areas of the canvas pitch black, and other areas stark white. It has a messy, but collective feeling in the piece, allowing al the different directions to cross and merge. There is areas of texture in the piece, that look rough and weathered because of how Auerbach has manipulated his media. Auerbach�s method in creating portrait studies involves noticing their key lines and shapes that make up a face, boldly emphasising them. The way he paints is distinctive, and easily recognisable because of his techniques. Auerbach makes tone no longer a necessity to the depth or forms of his work. He rather invites it to emphasise what he has already achieved on his own. His use of line is important for defining the features like the jaw or the side of the face. These things seem more and more unnessacery, but more as additional devices as we critically analyse his work and style of painting. The thick lines seem to pin the features within the painting down onto the canvas. Without them, the features in his work would seem as though they were floating. His paintings reflect this idea through how they give the impression of restriction of movement – A lack of freedom for the subjects within his pieces. The colours he uses within the piece suggest the struggle and the forced restraint of the colourful human spirit. Each painting conveys to me, a detectable fear, that is compressed well into the piece. As though the painting itself is smothering the subjects, so no one can see their true emotions. But they bleed through and over the lines in waves of distressed colour and abominations of shape and form. The more I looked at Auerbach�s work, the more I noticed how I could pick out certain lines and main areas, and especially while sketching his work, I found I by just reproducing my selected lines and areas, produced an image remarkably similar in form to Auerbach�s. This enabled me to begin to break down and take apart the whole structure of his works, and begin to achieve a greater depth and understanding of the way he works.
Susan Andrews – Art student from Cramlington High School – 21-Dec-2001Add your own comment.We very much welcome feedback and any further information that you can provide to help us maintain our databases. Auerbach, FrankGeneral InformationFrank Auerbach was born in Berlin. His Jewish parents sent him to boarding schoolin England as a refugee at the age of eight. After becoming an English citizen in 1947, he studied at St. Martin’s School of Art (1948-52) and the Royal College ofArt (1952-5). Auerbach also took evening art classes with David Bomberg, whobecame a strong inspirational source for the student’s emerging figurativepainting style, largely consisting of thick, heavily applied impasto. Auerbach has enjoyed a great deal of success in the modern art arena. As one of Britain’s leading contemporary artists, Auerbach is often considered a member of a group of “highly individual figurative painters known as the School of London.Through the successive postwar movements of Abstract Expressionism, Pop Art, Minimalism, and Conceptualism, these artists continued to paint from their own experience” (Higgins 128). His work was featured in a major Arts Council exhibition in 1978, and he participated in the 1986 Venice Biennale as a representative ofBritain. Even in the light of such public acclaim, the artist does receives negative critical commentary by those who find his paintings “muddy and overworked” (Chilvers 40). SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY Chilvers, Ian. A Dictionary of Twentieth Century of Art. Oxford/New York: Oxford University Press, 1998. p39-40. Ebony, David. “Urban Gestures,” Art In America 82:12 (Dec 1994) 88-91. Glover, Michael. “Frank Auerbach,” Art News 96:5 (May 1997) 176. Higgins, Judith. “Figure Under A Light Bulb,” Art News 87:4 (1988) 126-31. Peppiat, Michael. “Topographies of Color,” Architectural Digest 45:4 (1988) 43+. Phaidon Dictionary of Twentieth-Century Art. London/New York: Phaidon Limited, 1973. p17. Spender, Stephen. “Frank Auerbach,” Art International 26:1 (1983) 95-100.
The WorksSome highlights of works by this artist selected by Art Guide’s editors and readers.
Aberdeen Art Gallery, Scotland Portrait of JYM Seated
Ferens Art Gallery, Hull Building Site, Victoria Street
Touchstones Rochdale St Pancras steps
Aberdeen Art Gallery, Scotland Portrait of JYM Seated
Ferens Art Gallery, Hull Building Site, Victoria Street
Touchstones Rochdale St Pancras steps
On ViewSome museums where works by this artist are on view selected by Art Guide’s editors and readers.
Ben Uri Art Society and Gallery, London
Bolton Museum and Art Gallery
Cleveland Gallery, Middlesbrough
Crawford Municipal Gallery, Cork
Hartlepool Art Gallery
Huddersfield Art Gallery
Southampton City Art Gallery
Tate Britain, London
Glebe House and Gallery, Church Hill
Hugh Lane Municipal Gallery of Modern Art, Dublin Further Information Planning travel to the UK
Valuations/buying & selling art
Directory of living artists Learning about art
Supporting the arts Ben Uri Art Society and Gallery, London
Bolton Museum and Art Gallery
Cleveland Gallery, Middlesbrough
Crawford Municipal Gallery, Cork
Hartlepool Art Gallery
Huddersfield Art Gallery
Southampton City Art Gallery
Tate Britain, London
Glebe House and Gallery, Church Hill
Hugh Lane Municipal Gallery of Modern Art, Dublin Further Information Planning travel to the UK
Valuations/buying & selling art
Directory of living artists Learning about art
Supporting the arts Visitors ForumI REALLY LIKE HIS EXPRESSIVE NATUTRE AND LIFE FORMING VEGATATIVE BEING OF ANOTHER WORLDLY PAINTING WITH HALF CLOSED EYES SEEMS TO REACH OUT AND GRAB YOUR BALLS IN ASTONISHMENT. Otherwords bloody good stuff mate.
a.s.doherty – 29-Apr-2002I had the fortune to attend his recent exhibit; �Frank Auerbach at the National Gallery: Working after the Masters.’, and be able to see and analyse his paintings face to face. This is important, as when you see his work in books or photos, it looks flat. However, seeing the actual pieces, made me realise that they are very much 3D, with layer upon layer of paint. Auerbach used to paint them, building and manipulating such a thick quantity of paint on the canvas as though it were a modelling material. It is very hard to believe, looking at them, that it is just paint, not reinforced underneath with something else. After he had painted something, he would put it on top of a filing cabinet for however long it took to try. This was usually several months before such a layer of paint would dry solidly. The colours in Auerbach�s earlier work seemed to be of uniform and similar colours, but it was when he was a student, it was less expensive to buy the unpopular colours. I personally think some of his most dramatic work was his greyscale and black and white works. He is extremely dynamic in the way he applies his media, the brush strokes clearly visible, and in all directions. An example of this and one of my favourites of Auerbach�s is �Head of Julia� 1960. This piece is a portrait of a woman. He used charcoal to create the piece, select areas of the canvas pitch black, and other areas stark white. It has a messy, but collective feeling in the piece, allowing al the different directions to cross and merge. There is areas of texture in the piece, that look rough and weathered because of how Auerbach has manipulated his media. Auerbach�s method in creating portrait studies involves noticing their key lines and shapes that make up a face, boldly emphasising them. The way he paints is distinctive, and easily recognisable because of his techniques. Auerbach makes tone no longer a necessity to the depth or forms of his work. He rather invites it to emphasise what he has already achieved on his own. His use of line is important for defining the features like the jaw or the side of the face. These things seem more and more unnessacery, but more as additional devices as we critically analyse his work and style of painting. The thick lines seem to pin the features within the painting down onto the canvas. Without them, the features in his work would seem as though they were floating. His paintings reflect this idea through how they give the impression of restriction of movement – A lack of freedom for the subjects within his pieces. The colours he uses within the piece suggest the struggle and the forced restraint of the colourful human spirit. Each painting conveys to me, a detectable fear, that is compressed well into the piece. As though the painting itself is smothering the subjects, so no one can see their true emotions. But they bleed through and over the lines in waves of distressed colour and abominations of shape and form. The more I looked at Auerbach�s work, the more I noticed how I could pick out certain lines and main areas, and especially while sketching his work, I found I by just reproducing my selected lines and areas, produced an image remarkably similar in form to Auerbach�s. This enabled me to begin to break down and take apart the whole structure of his works, and begin to achieve a greater depth and understanding of the way he works.
Susan Andrews – Art student from Cramlington High School – 21-Dec-2001Add your own comment.We very much welcome feedback and any further information that you can provide to help us maintain our databases.